Thursday, March 28, 2013

Percy George Mayhew- Man of Many Trades


Percy George Mayhew Family Narrative
by Jamie Lee McManus Mayhew

Percy G. Mayhew picture1. percy george mayhew was born in Grand Rapids, Kent Michigan on 25 June 1882 to George Richmond Mayhew and Lucy Anne (Tucker) Mayhew.[1] He died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California on 2 October 1937[2] and is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Altadena, Los Angeles, California.[3] He married Helen Frances Mason born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio 29 August 1882, daughter of Albert G. Mason and Loretta “Lettie” (Howe) Mason, on 14 November 1908 in Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio.[4]

Percy George Mayhew was the second child born to George Richmond Mayhew and Lucy Anne Tucker.[5] This was the second marriage for Lucy who had married first, William E. Osgood[6] and was presumably left a widow with a young son, Harry Osgood, who she brought to her marriage with George R. Mayhew.[7] George and Lucy’s first child was a daughter, Blanche Mayhew, born in 1880.[8]

The Mayhew’s were a well-to-do family in Grand Rapids. George Richmond Mayhew, father of Percy, was a prominent businessman in Grand Rapids first as an owner of Loomis, Mayhew & Company at 30 Canal Street and later as G. R. Mayhew Boots and Shoes at 86 Monroe.[9] The family, especially Percy and Blanche, are frequently mentioned in the society pages attending parties and other social events.[10]

Percy’s father, George Richmond Mayhew, died 3 April 1899 of paralysis, the terminology used at that time for a stroke.[11] Lucy Mayhew was appointed guardian of Percy and Blanche.[12] In 1900, after the death of his father, Percy graduated from the exclusive Howe Military School at Lima, Indiana attending for his junior and senior years of high school.[13]
Percy began his employment career as a clerk, presumably at the store now owned by his mother. Local  directories list him as a pattern maker beginning in 1892.[14] In 1906 Percy G. Mayhew received his first patent for a waterproof shoe that by 1909 he was selling at the P. G. Mayhew Shoe Company. While in Grand Rapids, Percy became associated with Arthur Ford in the Michigan Felting company. When this business failed about 1910, he moved to Holland, Michigan where he started the P.G. Mayhew Company doing business as the Mayhew Textile Manufacturing Company. He continued to manufacture the creeping blanket for babies and interchangeable comforter filler, his second patent, until further financial troubles hit.

Percy married Helen Frances Mason of Cleveland Ohio on 14 November 1908.[15] There followed four children, Josephine Anne Mayhew, Nell Elizabeth Mayhew, George Richard Mayhew, and Jack Mason Mayhew.[16]

By 1914, Percy’s mattress business was in trouble, and Percy went to his mother for help. The following excerpt from a news article in the Grand Rapids News tells the story.
Miss Blanche M. Mayhew, sister, in an affidavit says her brother came to her last January, claiming he needed more collateral on which to raise money for his business. She says she had heard talks between her mother and Percy and understood that she would not give him more collateral.
She deposes that later he came to her and she took $3,400 in Commonwealth securities from the safety deposit box and gave them to him.
The brother was also given $7,000 in Citizens Telephone company stock. Later he was given $1,000 in lumber company stock. Later he threatened his sister and she says she gave him more securities which amounted finally to a very large figure.
In January, 1914, Miss Mayhew and her mother, who was critically ill, went to Chicago where the mother was treated by specialists. Percy followed them and again importuned his sister for more securities.
“I gave him the keys to the Michigan Trust box,” she deposes “I never knew until this trouble came up that he forged mother’s name to the letter of attorneyship, through which he gained admission to the box.”[17]

There followed a series of articles in the Grand Rapids and Holland newspapers until Percy was apprehended in early December 2014 by the Pinkerton detectives.[18] This strange family saga ended on Christmas day 2014 when Percy’s mother had a change of heart and telegraphed from the East to the authorities in Grand Rapids asking them to “let her poor boy go.”[19]

Ever the entrepreneur, Percy moved to Aurora, New York in 1915 where he leased the WaySide Inn.[20] Six months later he formed a group that purchased the St Lawrence Inn, in Gouverneur NY.[21]  Percy and Helen’s last child, Jack Mason Mayhew, was born while they were in Gouverneur, New York.[22]

In 1918, according to Percy’s daughter Nell, the cost of heat for the St. Lawrence Inn was too high and Percy brought his family to California where he started a new company making candy.[23] 

Percy became a widower on 22 August 1935 on the death of his wife Helen.[24] Percy George Mayhew died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California on 2 October 1937 at the age of fifty-three years, three months, and seven days of malignant nephroslerosis,[25] rapidly progressing kidney failure caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure. [26] Percy and Helen were cremated and are buried in Altadena at the Mountain View Cemetery.[27]

Children of Percy George Mayhew and Helen Frances Mayhew
i.                    Josephine Ann Mayhew born 25 May 1910 in Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan.[28] Married Jack Curtis 14 March 1931.[29] Died 8 Sept 2001 in Pawnee City, Pawnee, Nebraska.[30]
ii.                  Nell Elizabeth Mayhew born 18 April 1912 in Holland, Ottawa, Michigan.[31] She married first Freeman Henry Argetsinger 6 Jul 1935,[32] second Glenn Eugene Miller 16 November 1978.[33] She died 14 January 2001 in Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona.[34]
iii.                George Richard Mayhew born 7 August 1913 in Holland, Ottawa, Michigan.[35] He married Cleo Dorothy Hopp 14 February 1937 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.[36] He died 30 December 1980 in Long Beach, Los Angeles, California.[37]
iv.         Jack Mason Mayhew born 18 February 1917 in Gouverneur, St. Lawrence, New York.[38] He married Ethel Dutcher 25 February 1938 in Pasadena, Los Angeles, California.[39] He died 25 March 1988 in Newport Beach, Orange, California.




[1]“Michigan, Births, 1867-1902,” index and images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 15 Feb 2013) Perry Mayhew, 25 June 1882.
[2] California Department of Health Services, death certificate no. 37-063727, Percy Mayhew (1937), Vital Statistics Branch, Sacramento.
[3] Mountain View Cemetery (Altadena, Los Angeles, California), Percy Mayhew and Helen Mayhew marker, personally read, 2007.
[4] “Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973,” index and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : access 15 Feb 2013) volume: 70-71; page 224; application and return no. 59895, Percy G. Mayhew and Helen F. Mason marriage 14 Nov 1908.
[5] 1884 Michigan state census, Kent County, population schedule, 3rd Ward City of Grand Rapids, p. 112, dwelling 382, family 427, for Blanche Mayhew in George R. Mayhew household; FHL microfilm 984,118.
[6] “Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988,” index and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : access 15 Feb 2013) “Out of Town Marriages for the City of Boston for the year 1870,” pg 55, entry 22, William T. Osgood and Lucy A. Tucker 28 April 1870.
[7] No record has been found of the death of William T. Osgood nor of a divorce between Lucy and William Osgood.  George and Lucy Mayhew with Harry Osgood, are enumerated in 1880 U.S. census, Kent County, Michigan, population schedule, Grand Rapids, Enumeration District (ED) 138, p 6, dwelling 32, family 35, George R. Mayhew household; digital image, (http://www.ancestry.com : access 15 Feb 2013), citing FHL film 1254588.
[8] 1884 Michigan state census, Kent County, population schedule, 3rd Ward City of Grand Rapids, p. 112, dwelling 382, family 427, for Blanche Mayhew in George R. Mayhew household; FHL microfilm 984,118.
[9] See Grand Rapids City directories from 1867 through 1890. Also see Dan O’Reiley, “In the city,” Michigan Tradsman, 27 Jun 1884 “G. R. Mayhew is building a fine residence on South Prospect street, adjoining the home of Amos. M. Musselman”
[10] “From the Summer Resorts,” Grand Rapids Press, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 17 August 1901, digital images, Genealogybank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 15 February 2013) citing original page 6.  See also “Social News of the Week,” Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio, 15 November 1908, digital images, Genealogybank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 15 February 2013) citing original page 39,42. 
[11] “Geo. R. Mayhew Dead,” Grand Rapids Herald, Grand Rapids, Michigan 4 April 1899.
[12] “Court Records: Probate,” Grand Rapids Herald, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 8 April 1899, digital images, Genealogybank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 15 February 2013) citing original page 5.
[13] “Society,” Grand Rapids Herald, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 23 Dec 1900, digital images Genealogybank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 15 February 2013) citing original page 3.
[14] “Burns Agents Searching for Percy Mayhew: Young Business Man, Well Known in this City and Holland, Missing,” Grand Rapids Press, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 24 September 1914, digital images, Genealogybank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 15 February 2013) citing original page 2.
[15] “Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973,” index and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : access 15 Feb 2013) volume: 70-71; page 224; application and return no. 59895, Percy G. Mayhew and Helen F. Mason marriage 14 Nov 1908.
[16] 1920 U.S. Census, Los Angeles, California, population schedule, Hermosa Beach, Enumeration District (ED) 541, sheet 14A, dwelling 126, family 141, Percy G. Mayhew household; digital image, (http://www.ancestry.com : access 15 Feb 2013), citing National Archives microfilm publication  T625, roll 118.
[17] “Holland Mattress Man Soon to be Nabbed,” Holland City News, Holland, Michigan, 10 December 1914, page 1, column 5.
[18] “Holland Citizens Heavy Creditors: Percy G. Mayhew Co., Went Bankrupt for Thousands,” Holland City News, Holland, Michigan, 16 February 1915, page 1, column 4.
[19] ibid
[20] “News of the Nearby Towns: Arrora and Wells,” Auborn New York Citizen, Auborn, New York. See also, “Wanted in Michigan,” Auborn New York Citizen, Auborn, New York, 10 December 1914, page 6, column 3;digital image Old Fulton Postcards (http://Fultonhistory.com : accessed 20 February 2013)
[21] “St Lawrence Inn to be Reorganized; Corporation to Purchase Gouverneur Inn,” Watertown Daily Times, 27 December 1916, page 3, column 3; digital images, Genealogybank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 23 February 2013) Historical Newspapers (1690-1980)
[22] Nell Argetsinger, (Pawnee,Nebraska) to Jamie Mayhew (Hacienda Heights, California,) letter,  undated approximately 1975, privately held by Jamie Mayhew [Researcher’s Contact Information) 2013.
[23] Argetsinger to Mayhew, 1975. See also “St. Lawrence Inn Closed,” The Free Press, Gouverneur, New York, 6 December 1917, unpaginated, column 4. 
[24] "California, Death Index, 1905-1939," digital images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org: accessed 23 April 2012), 1930-1939 >Heslop, Nellie-Rzechtalski, Leon , image 384of 836, Mayhew, Helen, 22 August 1935
[25] California Department of Health Services, death certificate 37-063727, Percy Mayhew (1937), Office of State Registrar, Sacramento.
[26] Malignant Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis” The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook for Patients and Caregivers, (http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/kidney_and_urinary_tract_disorders/blood_vessel_disorders_of_the_kidneys/malignant_hypertensive_nephrosclerosis.html : accessed 23 February 2013) December 2007.
[27] Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 February 2013), photograph, “gravestone for Percy Mayhew (1882-1937) and Helen Mayhew(1882-1935), Memorial No. 12638889, Records of the Mountain View Cemetery and Mausoleum, Altadena, Los Angeles, California;” photograph © Shiver.
[28] Find A Grave, Inc., Find A Grave, digital image (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 February 2013), memorial, “for Josephine Anne Mayhew Curtis (1910-2001), Memorial No. 57751294, Records of the Pawnee City Cemetery, Pawnee City, Pawnee, California.”
[29] Cleo Mayhew, (Arcadia, Los Angeles, California)1975, address book containing birth, death and marriage information; privately held by Jamie Mayhew [Researcher’s Contact Information) 2013. This address book was held by George R. Mayhew after his wife, Cleo Mayhew died 3 September 1975 and came to the researcher on the death of George R. Mayhew 30 December 1980.
[30] Find A Grave, Inc. Find A Grave, memorial, “for Josephine Anne Mayhew Curtis (1910-2001), Memorial No. 57751294.
[31] Cleo Mayhew, (Arcadia, Los Angeles, California)1975, address book.
[32] Ibid
[33] “Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-2005,” Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 February 2013), marriage of Nell E. Argetsinger and Glen Eugene Miller, 16 November 1978; citing Nevada State Health Division, Office of Vital Records. Nevada Marriage Index, 1966-2005. Carson City, Nevada: Nevada State Health Division, Office of Vital Records.
[34] David Argetsinger, son of Nell E. Argetsinger (Orland, California), interview by Jamie Mayhew, 6 June 2011; notes privately held by interviewer, Yorba Linda, California, 2013.
[35] George R. Mayhew (Long Beach, California), interview by Jamie Mayhew, 1978; notes privately held by interviewer, Yorba Linda, California, 2013.
[36] “Certificate of Marriage,” couple’s copy, George R. Mayhew to Cleo D. Hopp, Mayhew family records held by Jamie Mayhew 2013. Held by George R. Mayhew after his wife, Cleo Mayhew died 3 September 1975 and came to the researcher on the death of George R. Mayhew 30 December 1980.
[37] Jamie Mayhew, personal knowledge of death of George R. Mayhew 30 December 1980.
[38] Argetsinger to Mayhew, letter, 1975.
[39] Undated newspaper clipping, “Mrs. Jack M. Mayhew” marriage of Jack M. Mayhew and Ethel Dutcher 25 February 1938 in Cleo Mayhew, scrapbook, ca. 1937-1975; Mayhew family records held by Jamie Mayhew 2013. Held by George R. Mayhew after his wife, Cleo Mayhew died 3 September 1975 and came to the researcher on the death of George R. Mayhew 30 December 1980.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Ida Ruth Eaglebarger - My Grandmother

Ida Ruth Eaglebarger 1917
I never met my grandmother, Ida Ruth Eaglebarger, as she died 5 August 1927 at the age of twenty-nine from breast cancer. In one of the pictures I have of her she looks like Annie Oakley. She's kneeling on one knee wearing a split skirt, a wide brimmed straw hat and holding a large shotgun. I have no idea why this picture was taken.

Ida Ruth was called just Ruth. She was born in Petty, Lemar, Texas on 27 February 1896. Her father, P. R. Eaglebarger was editor of the Western Christian Advocate. He also served as a Methodist Episcopal minister. Ruth was found as a 14 year in the 1910 census living in Little Rock, Arkansas with her parents and her older sister, Ross . In September her mother died and within a year she had a new stepmother. Ruth married James H. McManus in 1916 at the age of 20. In 1920 she had a son and a daughter in 1922. When her son, my father, was 7 and her daughter 5, she died. Her husband, my grandfather, never remarried.

My father described his mother as strict, someone to be afraid of. His life from the time of her death was a series of boarding houses with his father and spare rooms (sometimes the bathroom) with his aunts. He never lived with his grandfather and step grandmother.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Looking for Lucy

Lucy Mayhew has been an enigma for a number of years. She was the wife of George Richmond Mayhew. George became a fairly well-to-do shoe proprietor in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Before his death, he purchased a family plot in Oakhill Cemetery.  He reinterred his father who had died and been buried in  Ionia, Ionia, Michigan and buried his mother who died 29 May 18981 in the same plot. When George died 3 April 1899 he became the third and last family burial in his family plot.  Lucy was nowhere to be found.

George Richmond Mayhew was born 23 July 1850 in Abington, Plymouth, Massachusetts.2 The History of Kent County, Michigan, by Chapman, indicates that George R. Mayhew married Mrs. Lucy Osgood, born May 1855 in Massachusetts,3 in 1878 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.4

Lucy Osgood came to the marriage with a son from her previous marriage, Harry Osgood, born 9 February 1871 in Avon, Norfolk, Massachusetts.5

Lucy and George Mayhew had two children, Blanche Mayhew born March 18813 and Percy George Mayhew born 25 June 18826 both born in Grand Rapids, Kent, Michigan. George R. Mayhew died 3 April 18996 at just under 49 years of age. George Mayhew purchased a large family plot in Oakhill Cemetery in Grand Rapids where he is buried along with his mother, Lucretia Mayhew, and father, Abijah L. Mayhew. Lucy is not buried in the family plot.8

After her husband’s death, Lucy is found in the 1900 US Census in Grand Rapids Ward 3, Kent, Michigan as head of household with her daughter Blanche Poler, both living in the same house she had lived in previously with her husband. Lucy is listed as a widow born May 1855 in Massachusetts with both parents born in Massachusetts. Although Blanche is listed with the last name Poler, she is also listed as being single.3 In 1910 Lucy is again found in the same location in the US Census in Grand Rapids with her daughter who is now enumerated as Blanche Mayhew. The census indicates that Lucy had three children with two living although all three of her children are still alive at this time.9
In 1914 the family was involved in a crisis in which the son, Percy George Mayhew, stole a large sum of money, reportedly $30,000 in bearer bonds, from his mother’s safe deposit box. Newspaper articles describing the events indicate that Lucy was now in Aurora, New York.10 Lucy is not found in the 1920 US Census .

Several years ago, Ancestry.com first published passport applications and three applications were found for Harry Osgood. The first application dated 11 June 1917 contained a notarized letter from Harry’s aunt, Helen S. Tucker, attesting to the birth of Harry E. Osgood, son of William Osgood and Lucy Tucker Osgood on 9 February 1874 at the home of Lucy Tucker Osgood’s father Ebenezer Tucker in Avon, then East Stoughton, Massachusetts. Lucy did not provide any documentation for her son’s application.6

DISCUSSION:
Women frequently lived in the same area as a close relative or friend. It is probable that Lucy lived in the same area as one of her children after her husband’s death giving a starting point for this research. Harry Osgood was living in New Rochelle, Westchester, New York at the time of his passport application and is found there in the 1920 US Census11 but not the 1930 US census. Information from the passport application indicates that Lucy lived in East Stoughton [later Avon], Norfolk, Massachusetts prior to her marriage to George Richmond Mayhew.5 In a letter from Jo Curtis, daughter of Percy Mayhew, Jo Curtis says that her father and their family moved to California in 1918 from Governor, New York. No mention is made of Lucy Mayhew.13 Blanche Mayhew is not found in a cursory search of census records after 1910. My hypothesis is that Lucy Mayhew died between 1914 and 1917 in the state of New York, probably with her son Harry Osgood in New Rochelle.



So...Where's Lucy?


1. Michigan Department of State-Division of Vital Statistists, "Death Records, 1897-1920"; Seeking Michigan (http:seekingmichigan.org: accessed February 2012), transcript of certificate of death for Lucretia J Mayhew, Kent County, page 1064, registered number 498.
2. Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841–1910. (From original records held by the Massachusetts Archives) Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004.) vol 43:229 accessed April 2011.
3. 1900 U.S. Census. Kent County, Michigan,  population schedule, Ward 3 Grand Rapids, Enumeration District [ED] 54, p 309 (stamped), dwelling 4, family 4, Lucy A. Mayhew; digital images, Ancestry.com. (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed January 2012); from National Archives microfilm publication T623, roll 721.

4. History of Kent County, Michigan: Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages and Townships, Educational, Religious, Civil, Military, and Political History, Portraits of Prominent Persons, and Biographies of Representative Citizens : History of Michigan, Embracing Accounts of the Pre-Historic Races, Aborigines, French, English and American Conquests, and a General Review of Its Civil, Political and Military History. Chicago: C.C. Chapman & Co, 1881. Pg 1075 Internet resource.
5. U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007, citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Washington D.C.; Passport Applications, January 2, 1906 - March 31, 1925; ARC Identifier 583830 / MLR Number A1 534; NARA Series: M1490; Roll #1001.
6. Birth Certificate for Percy George Mayhew, State of Michigan Vital Records office, held by Jamie Mayhew.
7. Grand Rapids Press, 3 April 1899, Obituary, George R. Mayhew, pg 3 digital images GenealogyBank.com. (http://www.genealogybank.com. Accessed January 2012.)
8. Cemetery record card, Mayhew Plot, Oakhill Cemetery, Grand Rapids, Michigan.
9. 1910 U.S. Census. Kent County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3 Grand Rapids. enumeration District [ED] 0060, p 10A, image 813, dwelling 190, family 198, Lucy Mayhew; digital images. Ancestry.com. (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed January 2012); FHL film number 1374669 from National Archives microfilm publication T624 

10. Auborn NY Citizen, 1916 image 1912 Old Fulton Postcards [images online] (http://www.fultonhistory.com; accessed 2007).
11. 1884 Michigan State Census. Kent County, Michigan, population schedule (LDS Family History Library).
12. 1920 US Census, Westchester County, New York, population schedule, New Rochelle Ward 1, Enumeration District [ED] 111, page 9B, image 765, dwelling 144, family 175, Harry E. Osgood; digital images. Ancestry.com. (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed January 2012); from National Archives microfilm publication T625, roll 1278.

13. Jo Curtis, undated letter, in possession of Jamie Mayhew.

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Honoring two World War II soldiers

I've been away from blogging for a year now and since my last post was Veteran's Day 2010, I think it is fitting that I continue on Veteran's Day 2011.

My Dad, James H. McManus, Jr.,  was  in the US Army during WWII. This is an unlabeled picture, aren't most of them, so I'm not sure where it was taken.  I remember my parents always looking older than other children's parents. Here he is under 25 years old which I find amazing. 
This is my uncle, John William Orr (1922-1973).  Uncle John never married and has no descendents and he was my mother's favorite brother.  There are lots of family stories about Uncle John.  John is a very common name in my family.  Uncle John was born and grew up in Montevallo, Shelby, Alabama, a very small town, at the time, outside Birmingham.  In the family he was known as Country John while his Uncle John who lived in Birmingham was City John.  My Uncle John lived most of his life after the war in New York City but remained Country John to the family.

See my last post to learn about my mother who also served in the war.

Friday, November 12, 2010

Thanks to the Veterans

Yesterday was Veterans Day and we went to the Nixon Presidential  Library for the annual concert.  One of the traditions of the Placentia Symphonic Band is a US Military Medley.  As each of the songs associated with the military services is played all those in the audience who were in that service stand to be honored.  My mother, Marie Orr McManus, was in the WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) a division of the Navy during WWII.  If she were still alive, and there were a number of the age she would have been, she would have been standing to be honored.  So here's to you Mother, thank you for your service.

Monday, June 28, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday - Maple Grove Cemetery, Ravenna, Ohio

In 2007 we visited Ohio looking for cemetery records for my husband's Mason line.  These pictures come from the "MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY in Ravenna and Ravenna Twp.; 6698 SR 44, .3 mile north of Ravenna City limits on the east side of the road; originally named Evergreen Cemetery." according to the Portage County Historical Society .  There are other graves in the newer section of the cemetery but these draw a certain emotion just looking at them.  It was a sweltering day and near closing time for the cemetery and we had little time. Maple Grove is actually a beautiful cemetery with a lovely, peaceful lake. These graves are located toward the front of the cemetery way over on the right hand edge.  Maria (1820-1865) and Samuel Mason (1813-1852) were my husband's ggggrandparents. They had three children, Albert G (1846-1916), Samuel (1848-1856), and Amelia (1851-1852).  To the far right are Samuel, Maria, and Amelia's headstones. These tombstones do haunt me.

Sunday, June 27, 2010

More About Daddy

James Hoard McManus, born in Little Rock, Arkansas, January 31, 1920, was the son of James Hoard McManus (1887-1971) and Ida Ruth Eaglebarger (1896-1927).  His mother died at the age of 31 of breast cancer leaving a husband and two small children. The 1930 census shows the family enumerated under the name James H. Mcmannus as boarders in the Wisener household.  I remember my father talking about living with the Wisener's but, at this time, I don't know how long they stayed there.  I know my aunt went to live with her aunt and, most of the time, my father stayed with his father. My grandfather was a machinist with the railroad and my father sometimes lived with him and sometimes with relatives.  Daddy talked about living in the bathroom and sleeping in the tub. He built a shelf over the tub to hold his clothes.

He went to Louisiana State University for a two years prior to World War II and enlisted in the Army Air Corps 22 Dec 1941.  Daddy never fought in the war, spending most of his time working on transport planes.He was released from the service after the war in California and decided to stay.  He met my mother at UCLA saying that they were in a class together and he heard her southern accent, the only one in the room, and decided he had to meet her.  They were part of the post WWII marriages that produced the baby boomers of today, living in track homes that were built by the thousands in the suburbs of Los Angeles.